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THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF MARRIAGE

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The focus on rights and privileges has become a major characteristic of our modern culture. This focus has manifested itself in a variety of ways. One of these has been the focus upon the denial rights of the so-called underprivileged and oppressed – these namely being women (who, for some reason, are considered a minority), homosexuals, transgendered peoples, non-whites, non-Christians, and more. This focus on rights and privileges has perverted and corrupted all aspects of social and cultural life, including marriage.

For centuries, numerous political philosophers have seen the organisation of sex and reproduction as being vital to the health of a society. The most obvious form of this organisation could be found in marriage: an institution used by society to regulate family life, sex, and reproduction. The American political scientist, James Q. Wilson (1931 – 2012), said in his book, the Marriage Problem (2002): “Marriage is a socially arranged solution for the problem of getting people to stay together and care for children that the mere desire for children, and the sex that makes children possible, do not solve.”

Wilson observed in his book, the Moral Sense (1993):

“In virtually every society, the family is defined by marriage; that is, by a publicly announced contract that makes legitimate the sexual union of a man and a woman. Even in societies where men and women have relatively unrestricted sexual access to one another beginning at an early age, marriage is still the basis for family formation. It is desired by the partners and expected by society. Marriage, in short, is not simply a way of legitimizing sex, and so it cannot be dispensed with just because sexual activity need not be made legitimate. Marriage exists because people must take responsibilities for child care and assume economic obligations. Marriage, and thus the family that it defines, is a commitment.”

Christianity sees marriage as a covenant based on duty and commitment, not one based purely on feelings. Christian marriage is based on agape: the sacrificial love for another person. It is a love that is genuine, that endures through both good times and bad, that is not diminished by time or circumstance, that has a spiritual dimension, and is based on words and actions. This is a compassionate love, not a romantic one.

Marriages work when husbands and wives contribute equally to its health and vitality. Suffice to say, both husband and wife have duties and responsibilities in this regard. The first duty of the individual, then, is to psychologically separate themselves from their parents and siblings and form a new identity as husband or wife. (It is important to note here that this does not mean alienating or abandoning one’s birth family). After this, husbands and wives are duty-bound to love, honour, and trust each other. They should avoid any activity that may cause reasonable suspicion our jealousy so they may live in peace and harmony with each other. Finally, they ought to treat each other with reverence and respect: tolerating each other’s imperfections and being kind and charitable with one another.

The modern obsession with rights and privileges has created an imbalance. This imbalance can only be redressed by asserting the importance of individual responsibility.  One of the central places this can occur is through the focus on the obligations and responsibilities of spouses within the confines of marriage.

WHITE HOUSE BACKS BILL TO BAN ABORTIONS AFTER TWENTY-WEEKS

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The Trump administration has officially backed legislation that will ban abortions after twenty weeks. A statement from the White House read:

“The bill, if enacted into law, would help to facilitate the culture of life to which our Nation aspires. Additionally, the bill would promote a science-based approach to unborn life, as recent advancements  have revealed that the physical structures necessary to experience pain are developed within 20 weeks of  fertilization”

The bill, which is labelled the ‘Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act‘, is being sponsored by Republican Congressman from Arizona, Trent Franks. Under the bill, anyone who performs or attempts to perform an abortion on a fetus twenty-weeks or older will face criminal penalties, including a fine or a term of imprisonment of up to five years. Naturally, exceptions have been made which will allow women to utilise the medical procedure after the deadline if her life is in danger or if she is a victim of rape or incest.

As if on cue, the bill has faced a strong backlash from morally repugnant pro-choice groups, who have slammed it as ‘cruel’ and ‘unconstitutional’ (because America’s founding fathers totally believed in the right to murder unborn babies).  Heather Boonstra of The Hill condemned it as an attempt to “politicise women’s health, limit access to abortion care and stigmatise people who need later abortions” (the accusation of ‘politicising’ women in any way is a little rich coming from the left).  Similarly, Planned Parenthood tweeted: “20 week abortion bans are: unpopular, unconstitutional, part of the agenda to ban ALL abortion.”

MEN ARE DISPOSABLE

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Men are the expendable gender. Throughout history, societies have had less interest in protecting the lives of their young men than the lives of their young women.

This is not an idle theory, but a reality bared out by statistics. Men represent 99.99% of American combat deaths. Men make up 92.2% of workplace deaths in the United States, and 97% in the United Kingdom. Much of this disparity boils down to the different roles men and women have occupied over time. Across virtually all societies, even those where men and women are given free choice over their careers, jobs are divided along gender lines. Jobs which involve caring for children are typically performed by women. Jobs which involve a high risk of death or injury are typically performed by men.

The ‘women and children first’ mentality may seem outdated, but it serves an important function. Protecting the lives of young women serves to protect society from the existential threat of dwindling rates.

Men have relatively little to invest in the process of reproduction. Since they are not inconvenienced by pregnancy, they have the potential to impregnate dozens of women every year. (Even their sex gamete, sperm, is cheap: a single ejaculation contains hundred-million sperm cells and men’s bodies continue to produce sperm until they die). Women, by contrast, can only give birth every nine months. Women also lose fertility as they get older. A woman in her early twenties has an eighty-six percent chance of conceiving, in her early to mid-thirties she has a fifty to sixty percent chance, and in her forties, she has only a thirty-six percent chance.  And, unlike men, women are not blessed with an infinite number of sex gametes, either. Out of three hundred thousand ova, a woman will typically only ovulate three to four hundred before reaching menopause.

It is absolutely integral for a society to keep their birth-rates at replacement levels, and the best way to do this is by protecting the lives of fertile women. Since women have to invest so much in reproduction, every society has a vested interest in their personal safety. The same cannot be said for men, whose investment in reproduction takes only a few minutes. This is why young men are sent to war, why young men are more likely to die at work, and, yes, why men are more expendable than women.